Beets - Detroit Golden Beets Untreated

Golden beets are known as the child-friendly, easy to clean up, and extra-super-nutritious version of a humble root. But they are so much more: tender, sweet, and mellow; the color of a Summer sunset; luxurious pickled or in salads, steamed or roasted. And, golden beets have golden greens that are lavish in their own right.

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29860_UV

Approx. seeds per packet75

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Golden beets are known as the child-friendly, easy to clean up, and extra-super-nutritious version of a humble root. But they are so much more: tender, sweet, and mellow; the color of a Summer sunset; luxurious pickled or in salads, steamed or roasted. And, golden beets have golden greens that are lavish in their own right.

Heres how to grow these gems: Four weeks before your usual last frost date, prepare a seed bed by adding materials like well-rotted compost, hardwood ashes (a quarter gallon spread over 100 square feet) and low-nitrogen granular fertilizer to create a loose, rich soil with plenty of organic matter. Sow seeds 1/2 inch deep, 1 inch apart with 14 inches of space between rows. Keep soil moist and free of weeds. Leaves emerge in 7 to 20 days. After two weeks, thin to 2 inches apart and two weeks later, thin again to 4 inches apart, and fertilize for the last time.

Beets do best in consistently moist soil, so mulch and water regularly. Fertilize and mulch again after a month. Harvest beets when they are 1 inch in diameter (about 40 days) or 2 to 3 inches diameter after 60 days. Young beet greens can be harvested sparingly while the root takes shape; used at the same time the beets are pulled; or grown as a crop without harvesting the root.